Fellowships & Grants

Grants

Small grants are available to Berkeley Ph.D. students for archival visits, data gathering, digitization of historical data, and other dissertation-related projects. Students should feel free to apply regardless of field so long as their project has an historical dimension. There is no set deadline. Grants should in general not exceed $4,000 (the smaller the grant the greater the probability of success, other things equal). Applicants should provide a brief (two-page) description of their project and the purpose to which the grant will be put, an itemized budget, a time schedule, and a letter of recommendation from a member of the faculty. If equipment is purchased using grant funds, that equipment will revert to BEHL at the end of the grant period.

Submit proposals by mail or email to:

Professor Barry Eichengreen
Department of Economics
530 Evans Hall / MC 3880
Berkeley, CA 94720
eichengr@econ.berkeley.edu
 

BEHL Mentored Fellowships

BEHL awards three fellowships yearly for continuing Ph.D. students. Recipients will work with one or more members of the Berkeley Economic History Laboratory faculty on joint research projects.

First-Year Fellowship

This award is presented to an entering graduate student indicating an interest in pursuing economic history. The recipient is chosen by Professor Eichengreen, Patrick Allen, Director of Student Services, and the head of the Department of Economics graduate admissions committee. Interested students should contact Patrick Allen by email (pallen@econ.berkeley.edu) or at the Department of Economics graduate office (541 Evans Hall).

Past Award Recipients

2012-13: Irfan Hafeez
2013-14: Walker Ray
2014-15: Joseph Root
2015-16: Todd Messer

Second-Year-Student Mentored Fellowship

The successful applicant will receive a stipend equivalent to that earned by a 50 percent time graduate student researcher. He or she will be expected to work 25 percent time on his or her own research project and 25 percent time together with one or more members of the BEHL-affiliated faculty on a faculty research project (hence the “mentored” student fellowship).

Deadline:  Applications will be accepted through May 20, 2016.

Award: Stipend, fees and nonresident tuition for those who are not California residents.

Eligibility: First-year Ph.D. students in economics enrolled in Economics 210a who have completed or are soon to complete their 210a research paper and who, through their research project proposal (see below), display an interest or potential interest in economic history.

Application procedure: Submit the following to the Department of Economics graduate office (541 Evans Hall) by the application deadline (preferred submission is by email to Vicky Lee at vickyalee@econ.berkeley.edu:

  • Completed 210a research paper.
  • One-page description of applicant’s potential second-year research project.
  • Indication of other sources of funding available or pending for the coming academic year (if any).

Past Award Recipients

2011: Simon Galle for his work on the role of public policy in 19th-century American economic development, and a second project on the role of public works spending in the Great Depression.
2012: Gillian Brunet for her work on the federal budget appropriations process in historical perspective.
2013-2014: Dimitri Koustas for his work on the long-term labor market impacts of the Great Depression and other historical recessions, the uneven effects of recessions on workers with different educational attainment, and the role of education in mitigating labor market scarring.
2015-2016: Marc Dordal i Carreras for his research “U.S. Banking Panics and the Credit Channel: Evidence from 1870-1904”

Continuing-Student Mentored Fellowship

The successful applicant will receive a stipend equivalent to that earned by a 50 percent time graduate student researcher. He or she will be expected to work 25 percent time on his or her own research project and 25 percent time together with one or more members of the BEHL-affiliated faculty on a faculty research project (hence the “mentored” student fellowship).

Deadline: Applications will be accepted through May 20, 2016.

Award: Stipend, fees and nonresident tuition for those who are not California residents.

Eligibility: Full-time Ph.D. students in economics who have completed their first year of graduate study when submitting an application and are conducting or contemplating research in economic history.

Application procedure: Submit the following to the Department of Economics graduate office (541 Evans Hall) by the application deadline. Preferred submission is by email to Vicky Lee at vickyalee@econ.berkeley.edu:

  • One-page description of applicant’s potential second-year research project.
  • Letter of recommendation from a faculty member.
  • Indication of other sources of funding available or pending for the coming academic year (if any).

Past Award Recipients

2011: Dominick Bartelme for his project “The Gibson Paradox, the Fisher Effect, and the Real Effects of Deflation under the Gold Standard: Evidence from Railway Bonds.”
2012: Eric Auerbach for his work on railway construction and market integration in 19th-Century America.
2013:  Erik Johnson for his project “Fiscal Federalism and Debt Sustainability: Historical Lessons from Canada.”
2014: Gillian Brunet for her work on the federal budget appropriations process in historical perspective.
2015: Evan Rose for his work on female labor force participation after World War II.

INET Prize for Best First-Year Paper in Economic History

This yearly prize recognizing graduate student research is awarded at the UC Berkeley Department of Economics spring commencement ceremony.

The 2016 prize was award to Zach Bleemer for “‘Role Models and Information Frictions in Early 20th Century American Higher Education.”

Past Award Recipients

  • 2011: Markus Pelger for “Social Networks of Historical Banking Families in the 15th and 16th Centuries.”
  • 2012: Marion Aouad for “Understanding the Self-Freed Blacks of Philadelphia in 1838: Industriousness, Skill, Wealth and Schooling.”
  • 2013: Natalie Cox for “The Final Straw: Explaining the Fall of the Straw Plait Industry in 19th Century Britain.”
  • 2014: Juliana Londoño Vélez for her paper “War and Progressive Income Taxation in the 20th Century.”
  • 2015: Evan Rose for “Rosie and Her Daughters: Revisiting Female Labor Force Participation after World War II.”